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షేక్స్పియరుని కవిత్వ మందలి సొగసులు

వీరరసము

His legs bestrid the ocean ; his reared arm
Crested the world ; his voice was propertied
As all the tuned spheres, and that to friends ;
But when he meant to quail and shake the orb,
He was as rattling thunder. For his bounty,
There was no winter in't ; an autumn't was,
That grew the more by reaping ; his delights
Were dolphin-like ; they showed his back above
The element they lived in : in his livery
Walked crowns and crownets ; realms and islands
were
As plates dropped from his pocket. 5

                                                 Saucy lictors
Will catch at us, like strumpets; and scaldrhymers
Ballad us out o'tune : the quick comedians
Extemporally will stage us, and present
Our Alexandrian revels. 6

AS YOU LIKE IT Act. I. Sc. II
I beseech you, punish me not with your hard thoughts,
wherein I confess me much guilty to deny so
fair and excellent ladies anything. But let your
fair eyes and gentle wishes go with me to my trial;
wherein if I be foiled, there is but one shamed

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that was never gracious; if killed, but one dead that
is willing to be so. I shall do my friends no wrong
for I have none tolament rue; the world no injury,
for in it I have nothing; only in the world I fill
up a place, which may be better supplied when I
have made it empty. 7

CORIOLANUS Act I. Sc. I

I sin in envying his nobility ;
And were I anything but what I am 3
I'd wish me only he. 8

Sc. iii.



I pray you, daughter, sing ; or express yourself in
a more comfortable sort : if my son were my husband
I should freelier rejoice in that absence wherein
he won honour, than in the embracenients of his
bed where he would show most love. When yet
he was but tender-bodied, and the only son of
my womb ; when youth with comliness plucked all
gaze his way; when for a day of Kings' entreaties,
a mother should not sell him an hour from her
beholding; I, ---considering how honour would
become such a person; that it was no better than
picture-like to hang by the wall, if renown
made it not stir, --- was pleased to let him
seek danger where he was like to find fame.
To a cruel war .. I sent him ; from whence lie

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returned his brows bound with oak. I tell thee
daughter 3 1 sprang not more in joy at first hearing
he was a manchild than now in first seeing
he had proved himself a man.

Vir. But had he died in the business, madam; ---
how then ?

Vol. Then his good report should have been my
son ; I therein would have found issue. Hear me
profess sincerely, had I a dozen sons, each in my
love alike, and none less dear than thine and my
good Marcius, I had rather have eleven die nobly
for their country than one voluptuously surfeit out
of action.

Act. II. Sc. i.



(1) Death, that dark spirit, in's nervy arm doth lie,
Which, being advanced, declines, and then men die. 10

Act. Ill Sc. i.



(2) His nature is too noble for the world :
He would not flatter Neptune for his trident,
Or Jove for's power to thunder. His heart's his mouth.
What his breast forges, that his tongue must vent;
And, being angry, does forget that ever
He heard the name of death. 10

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Sc. ii.


 
Honour and policy, like imsevered friends, L
r the war do grow together : grant that, and tell
In peace, what each of them by the other lose,
That they combine not there ? 11

Act. IV. Sc. v.



Let me have war, say I; it exceeds peace as far as
day does night; it's spritelyj waking audible and
full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy ;
mulled, deaf, sleepy, insensible ; a getter of more
bastard children than war's a destroyer of men. 12

Act. V. Sc. i.



The veins unfilled, mir blood is cold, and then
We pout upon the morning, are unapt
To give or to forgive ; but when we' ve stuffed . ;
These pipes and these conveyances of our blood
With wine and feeding, we have suppler souls
Than in our priest-like fasts : therefore I'll watch him
Till he be dieted to. my request,
And then I'll, set upon him. 13

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Act. V. Sc. ii.


 
He that hath a will to die by himself fears it not
from another. 14

CYMBALINE Act. I. Sc. VI
 
He sits Amongst men like a descended god ; 15
 
HAMLET Act I Sc. II
 
He was-a man,-' take" him for all in all,
I shall not look upon his like again. 16

Sc. iv.


 
Why, what should be the fear ?
I do not set my life at a pin's fee ;
And, for my soul, what can it do to that,
Being a thing immortal as itself ? 17

Act. II Sc. ii.


 
Doubt. thou the stars are. fire ;
Doubt that the sun doth move ;
Doubt truth to be a liar ;
- But never doubt, ! love.

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Act. IIL Sc. i.


 
O, what a noble mind is here overthrown !
The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword;
The expectancy and rose of the fair state,
The glass of fashion, and the mould of form,
The observed of all observers, quite, quite down !
And I a of ladies most deject and wretched,
That sucked the honey of his music vows,
Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;
That unmatched form and feature of blown youth,
Blasted with ecstasy. 19

Sc. ii.



Nor earth to me give food, nor heaven light;
Sport and repose lock from me day and night;
To desperation turn my trust and hope;
An anchor's cheer in prison be my scope;
Each opposite, that blanks the face of joy
Meet what I would have well, and it destroy;
Both here, and hence, pursue me lasting strife,
If, once a widow, ever I be wife ! 20

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JULIUS CAESAR Act I Sc. II

What is it that you would impart to me ?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honour in one eye and death i' the other,
And I will look on both indifferently ;
For, let the gods so speed me, as I love.
The name of honour more than I fear death. 21

Act. II. Sc. ii.


 
Cowards die many times before their deaths ;
The valiant never taste of death but once, 22

Act. III. Sc. ii.



If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of
Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar
was no less than his. If then that friend demand,
why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer.
Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome
more. Had you rather Caesar were living, and die
all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live
all freemen? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him;
as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it ; as he was
valiant, I honour him; but, as he was ambitious I
slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his for-
tune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambi

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tion. Who Is here so base that would be a bondman ?
If any. speak: for him have I offended. Who is
here so rude, that would not be a Roman ? If any,
speak for him have I offended. Who is here so vile 5
that will not love his country ? If any, speak; for him
have I offended. 23

Act. V. Sc. v.



His life was gentle ; and the elements
So mixed in him, that nature might stand up
And say to all the world, "This was a man"! 24

HENRY V Act. IV Sc. III

if it be a sin to covet honour.
I am the most offending soul'alive. 25

HENRY VI PART I Act. IV Sc. VI

Tal. O young John Talbot ! I did send for thee
To tutor thee in stratagems of war,
That Talbof s name might be in thee revived
When sapless age and weak unable limbs
Should bring thy father to his drooping chair.
But, O malignant and ill-boding stars !
Now thou art come unto a feast of deariii,
A terrible and unavoided danger.

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Therefore, dear boy, mount on my swiftest horse,
And I 'll direct thee how thou shalt escape
By sudden flight ; come, dally not, be gone.
John. Is my name Talbot ? and am I your son ?
And shall I* fly ? o 3 If you love my mother,
Dishonour not her honourable name,
To make a bastard and a slave of me !
The world will say he is not Talbof s blood,
That basely fled when noble Talbot stood.
Tal. Fly, to revenge my- death, if I be slain,
John. He that files so will ne'er return again.
Tal. If .we both- stay, we both are sure to die.
John. Then let me stay., and, .father, do you fly ;
Your loss -is great; so your regard, should be ;
My worth unknown, no loss is known in me.
Upon iny4e^tli the French can little boast ;
In yours tliey>4,f|, in you all hopes are lost.
Flight cannot staifr the honour you have won;
But mine it will, thkt no exploit have done. ,
You fled for vantage, '^yery' one will swear;
But, if I bow, they Tl sayit was for fear.
There is no hope that ever I will stay,
If the first hour I shrink and. run away.
Here on my knee I beg mortality,
Rather than life preserved with infamy.
Tal. Shall all thy mother's hopes lie in one tomb ?
John. Ay,. rather than I 11 shame my mother's womb.
Tal. Upon my blessing, I command thee go.
John. To fight I will, but not to fly the foe.
Tal. Part of thy Father may be saved in thee,
John. No part of him but will be shame in me.
Tal. Thou never hadstreknown, nor caiist not lose it.
John. Yes, your renowned name; shall. flight abuse it?
Tal. Thy father's charge shall clear thee froin'ttiat.
stain.
John. You cannot witness for me, being. slain,
If death be so apparent, then both fly.
Tal. And leave my followers ligre to fight and .die ?.

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     My age was never tainted with such shame.
John. And shall my youth be guilty of such blame ?
No more can I be severed from your side,
Than can yourself yourself in twain divide.
Stay, go, do what you will., the like do I;
For live I will not, if my father die. 26

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PART II Act. III Sc. ii
 
What stronger breastplate than a heart 'untainted ?
Thriee is he arme ! that hath his quarrel just ;
And he but naked, though locked up in steel,'
Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. 27

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Act. III. Sc. iii.


 
If I depart from thee 3 I cannot live;
And in thy sight to die, what were it else
But like a pleasant slumber in thy lap ?
Here could I breathe my soul into the air;
As mild and gentle as the cradle-babe,
Dying with mother's dug between its lips; 28

Act. V. Sc. i.



It is great sin to swear unto a sin,
But greater sin to keep a sinful oath.
Who can be bound by any solemn vow
To do a murderous deed,, to -rob a man,
To force a spotless virgin's chastity,
To reave the orphan of his' patrimony,'
To wring the widow from her customed right,
And have no other reason for this wrong,
But that he was bound by a solemn oath ? 29

Sc. ii.


 
He that is truly dedicate to war
Hath no self-love; nor he that loves himself
Hath not essentially, but by circumstance.
The name of valour. 30

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PART III Act V Sc. IV.

wise men-ne'er sit and wail their loss,
But cheerly seek how to redress their harms. 31

KING JOHN Act. IV Sc. II

The wall is high ; and yet will 1 leap down
Good ground, be pitiful, and hurt me not !
There's few or none do know me ; if they did.
This ship boy's semblance hath disguised me quite.
I am afraid ; and yet I'll venture it.
If I get down, and do not break my limbs,
I'll find a thousand shifts to get away :
As good to die and go, as die and stay .
O me ! my uncle's spirit is in these stones.
Heaven take my soul, and England ketep my bones! 32

RICHARD II Act. Ill. Sc. II.

Wise men ne'er wail their present woes,
But presently prevent the ways to wail. 33

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Sc. iv.


 
Go, bind thou up yond dangling apricocks,
Which,, like unruly children, make their sire
Stoop with oppression of their prodigal weight;
Give some supportance to the bending twigs.
Go thou ? and like an executioner
Cut off the heads of too-fast-growing sprays,
That look too lofty in our commonwealth
All ninst be even in our Government.
You thus employed, I will go root away
The noisome weeds, that without, profit suck
The soil's fertility from wholesome flowers. 34

LOVES LABOUR'S LOST Act. I Sc. I.

Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives,
Live registered upon our brazen tombs,
And then grace us in the disgrace of death;
When, spite of cormorant devouring Time,
The endeavour of this present breath may buy
That honour which shall bate his scythe's keen edge,
And make us heirs of all eternity. 35

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MACBETH. Act. 1. Sc. VII.

I dare do all that may become a man ;
Who dares do more is none 36

MEASURE FOR MEASURE Act II Sc. II

Not the king's crown, nor the deputed sword,
The marshal's truncheon, nor the judge's robe,
Become them, with one half so good, a grace
As mercy does. 37

Sc. iv.


 
'T were as good
To pardon him that hath from nature stolen
A man already made, as to remit
Their saucy sweetness that do coin Heaven's image
In stamps that are forbid; 5 t is all as easy
Falsely to take away a life true made,
As to put metal in restrained means.,
To make a false one. 38

Better it were, a brother died at once
Than that a sister, by redeeming him.
Should die for ever. 39

Ignomy in ransom, and free pardon,
Are of two houses : lawful mercy
Is nothing akin to foul redemption. 40

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MIDSUMMER-NIGHT'S DREAM Act. V. Sc. I.
 
Never anything can be amiss
When simpleness and duty tender it. 41

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. Act. 11. Sc. I.

Friendship is constant in all other things
Save in the office and affairs of love ;
Therefore, all hearts in love use their own tongues ;
Let every eye negotiate for itself,
And trust no agent ; for beauty is a witch ;
Against whose charms faith melteth into- blood. 42

Sc. iii.


 
Happy are they that hear their detractions, and can
put them to mending. 43

Act. III. Sc. ii.


 
He hath a heart as sound as a bell, and His tongue is
the clapper, for what his heart thinks,, his tongue
speaks. 44

OTHELLO Act. IV. Sc. II.

And his unkindness may defeat my life,
But never taint my love.
 
PERICLES. ' Act. II Sc. IlI

Contend not, sir ; for we are gentlemen
That neither in our hearts nor outward eyes
Envy the gwat, nor do tke low despise.

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ROMEO AND JULIET. Act. V. Sc. III.

Yea, noise ? then I'll be brief. O happy dagger !
This is thy sheath : (stabs herself) there rust and let
me die. 47

TEMPEST. Act. IV. Sc. I.

the murkiest den,
The most oppurtune place, the strongest suggestion
Our worser Genius can, 'shall never melt
Mine honour into lust, to take away
The edge of that days' celebration,,
When I shall. think, or Phoebus' steeds are foundered,
Or night kept chained below. 48

TIMON OF ATHENS Act. I Sc. I.
 
When we for recompense have praised the vile;
It stains the glory in that happy verse,
Which aptly sings the good. 49
 

Sc. ii.


 
'T is pity bounty had not eyes behind,
That nikn might ne'er be wretched for his mind. 50

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Act. IIL Sc. v.


 
You cannot make gross sins look clear :
To revenge is no valour, but to bear 51
 
TITUS ANDRONICUS Act. I Sc. I

Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge. 52

thanks to men
Of noble minds is honourable meed. 53

Act. III. Sc. i.



That ever death should let life bear his name,
Where life hath no more interest but to breathe ! 54

Act. V. Sc. iii.



Friends should associate friends in grief, and woe 55
 
TROILUS AND CRESSIDA Ac. I Sc. II.

Do you know what a man is ? Is not birth, beauty,
good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness
virtue, youth, liberality, and so forth, the spice and
salt, that season a man ? 56

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Act. II Sc. ii.



(I) The wound of peace is surety,
Surety secure; but modest doubt Is called,
The beacon of the wise,, the tent that searches
To the bottom of the worst.

(2) to be wise and love
Exceeds man's might; that dwells will Gods above 57

Act. V. Sc. iii.


 
Life every man holds dear ; but the brave man
Holds honour far more precious-dear than life.-- 58

Let's leave the hermit pity with out mothers,
And when we have our armours buckled, on,
The venomed vengeance ride upon our swords :
Spur them to ruthful work, rein them from wth. 59
 
TWELFTH NIGHT Act. Ill Sc. VI

(1) In nature there's no blemish but the mind : ;
None can be called deformed but the unkind :
Virtue is beauty; but the beauteous-evil
Are empty trunks, o'crflourished by the devil.

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TWO GENTLEMEN QF VERONA Act. II. Sc. VII

(2) His words are bonds, his oaths are oracles ;
His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate ;
His tears pure messengers sent from his heart ;
His heart as far from fraud as heaven from earth. 60

WINTER'S TALE Act. I Sc. I.

it is safer to
Avoid what's grown than question how 't is born. 61
 

Act. IV, Sc iii.



If I might die within this hour, 1 have lived
To die when I desire. 62
 
VENUS AND ADONIS.

By law of nature thou art bound to breed.
That thine may live, when thou thyself art dead ;
And so in spite of death thou dost survive,,
In that thy likeness still is left alive. 63

They that thrive well take counsel of their friends. 64

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To see his face, the lion walk'd along
Behind, some hedge, because he would not fear him;
To recreate himself when he hath sung,,
The tiger would be tame, and gently hear hint
If lie had spoke, the wolf would leave his prey,
Arid never fright the silly lamb that day. 65

RAPE OF LUCRECE

Princes are the glass, the school., the book.,
Where subjects' eyes do learn, do read, do look. 66

He shall not boast, who did thy stock-pollute.
That thou art doting father of his fruit.
Nor shall be smile at thee in secret thought,
Nor laugh with his companions at thy state ;
But thou shalt know thy interest was not bought
Basely with gold, but stol'n from forth thy gate. ;
For me, I am the mistress, of my fate,,
And with my tresspass never will dispense,,
Till life to death acquit my forc'd offence. 67

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My honour I'll bequeath unto the knife
That wounds my body so dishonoured,
'T is honour to deprive dishonoured life;
The one will live, the other being dead:
So of shame's ashes shall my fame be bred;
For in my death I murder shameful scorn:
My shame so dead, mine honour is new-born.

Dear lord of that dear jewel I have lost,
What legacy shall I bequeath to thee ?
My resolution, love shall be thy boast,
By whose example thou revenged may'st be,
How Tarquin must be used, read It in me :
Myself, thy friend, will kill myself, thy foe,
And for my sake serve thou false Tarquin so. 68

O ! teach me how to make mine own excuse,
Or, at the least, this refuge let me find :
Though my gross blood be stain'd with this abuse,
Immaculate and spotless is my mind ; 69

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That was not forced; that never was inclined.
To accessory yieldings, but still pure
Doth in her poison'd closet yet endure

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